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Friday, July 31, 2020 | History

3 edition of Biodiversity and agricultural intensification found in the catalog.

Biodiversity and agricultural intensification

Biodiversity and agricultural intensification

partners for development and conservation

  • 302 Want to read
  • 3 Currently reading

Published by World Bank in Washington, D.C .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Agrobiodiversity.,
  • Agricultural intensification.,
  • Agrobiodiversity conservation.,
  • Sustainable agriculture.,
  • Sustainable development.

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references.

    Statement[edited by] Jitendra P. Srivastava, Nigel J.H. Smith, Douglas A. Forno.
    SeriesEnvironmentally sustainable development studies and monographs series ;, no. 11
    ContributionsSrivastava, Jitendra, 1940-, Smith, Nigel J. H., 1949-, Forno, Douglas, 1946-
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsS589.7 .B56 1996
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxii, 128 p. :
    Number of Pages128
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL997457M
    ISBN 100821337599
    LC Control Number96036166

    This level of intensification includes such systems as the intensive fruit plantations of the tropics, the intensive orchard systems of California and the Mediterranean, intensive cereal production throughout the world, and large-scale vegetable production. Impact of agricultural intensification on biodiversity. across agriculture, forestry and fisheries. It recognizes that biodiversity is an integral part of agriculture and is committed to working with governments and other key actors to mainstream biodiversity as a vital element of sustainable agriculture. BURKINA FASO Mixed cropping of maize and mucuna for soil fertility improvement and weed control.

    The ambition for sustainable agricultural intensification (SAI) is highlighted in the Sustainable Development Goals; Life on Land, which aims to sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, halt and review land degradation and halt biodiversity loss; and SDG2 Zero hunger which seeks to ensure sustainable food production systems. Get this from a library! Integrating biodiversity in agricultural intensification: toward sound practices. [Jitendra Srivastava; Nigel J H Smith; Douglas Forno] -- Agrobiodiversity - biological resources that directly and indirectly contribute to crop and livestock production - is arguably the single most important natural resource in worldwide efforts to.

      2. Ecological significance of crop and non-crop habitats for biodiversity conservation. Agroecosystems hold a large proportion of the world's biodiversity (Pimentel et al. ).However, there is increasing evidence that the expansion of agricultural intensification has contributed to a rapid decline of biodiversity in agroecosystems (Barr et al. ; Chamberlain et al. ; Robinson. Declines in plants and herbivorous insects due to land use abandonment and intensification have been studied in agricultural areas worldwide. We tested four hypotheses, which were complementary rather than mutually exclusive, to understand the mechanisms driving biodiversity declines due to abandonment and intensification.


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Biodiversity and agricultural intensification Download PDF EPUB FB2

This book examines land use intensification and biodiversity conservation and its impacts. It also discusses whether suites of species, and/or functional groups of taxa will either benefit or suffer from land use intensification and whether it is possible to make robust predictions of biotic responses across landscapes, regions, and continents.

The Role of Intellectual Property Rights in Agriculture and Allied Sciences book. Edited By Integrating the conservation of biodiversity with agricultural intensification is increasingly through intellectual property rights (IPRs) recognized as a leading priority of sustainability and food security amid global environmental and Author: Sujit Kumar, Seweta Srivastava.

Bird Conservation and Agriculture (Ecology, Biodiversity and Conservation) Biodiversity and agricultural intensification book Edition by Jeremy D. Wilson (Author) › Visit taken together, illustrate the many ways that agricultural intensification has affected bird populations. Moreover, they show how this evidence base, coupled with recent greening of agriculture policy, has provided 5/5(1).

There are many different viewpoints about the best way to deal with the myriad issues associated with land use intensification and this book canvasses a number of these from different parts of the. Land Use Intensification: Effects on Agriculture, Biodiversity and Ecological Processes Saul Cunningham, Andrew Young, David Lindenmayer Csiro Publishing, - Science - pages.

Agricultural intensification affects biodiversity on a global scale During the last decades, worldwide losses of biodiversity have occurred at an unprecedented scale and agricultural intensification has been a major driver of this global change (Matson et al.

; Tilman et al. Increased agricultural intensification and industrialization of land are accompanied by widespread use of inputs, plant and animal products, and biocides (Box ).These have effects on the various components of biodiversity and the health of wildlife and human health.

Agricultural intensification is best considered as the level of human appropriation of terrestrial net primary production.

The global value is set to increase from 30%, increasing pressures on biodiversity. The pressures can be classified in terms of spatial scale, i.e. land cover, landscape management and crop management. ( Mha) in (FAO ). The Aichi Biodiversity Target 11 specifies a target of 17% for (Convention on Biological Diversity ).

A second approach is to promote the ecological intensification of existing agricultural land (AltieriUnited NationsRodale Institute ) to regenerate soils and conserve biodiversity.

Firbank L G, Petit S, Smart S, Blain A and Fuller R J Assessing the impacts of agricultural intensification on biodiversity: a british perspective Phil.

Trans. Soc. B – Crossref Google Scholar. Agricultural intensification generally results in a 4. Conclusion loss of soil biodiversity (Hawksworth, ; Swift and Anderson, ). Available data show a reduc- Termite diversity and the biological stability of tion in termite diversity with several forms of inten- natural ecosystems may be mutually reinforcing phe- sification but there are clear exceptions.

The ‘sparing or sharing’ debate contrasts two response pathways: intensifying agriculture to release other land for protection versus biodiversity-friendly farming over larger areas. Most conservation policies focus on intensification and set-aside but recent research challenges these assumptions.

The linkages between agriculture and biodiversity have changed over time. Global agricultural production and productivity have substantially increased from both intensification as well as extensification processes and also from a combination of improved varieties and agronomic practices.

However, conventional forecasts for the. ISBN: OCLC Number: Description: xii, pages: illustrations ; 28 cm. Contents: 1. Agriculture as friend and foe of biodiversity / Jitendra P. Srivastava, Nigel J.H. Smith, and Douglas A. Forno Harmonizing biodiversity conservation and agricultural development / Noel Vietmeyer Policy considerations along the interface between biodiversity and.

intensification approaches - such as agroecology - encourage agricultural habitat diversification that enhances biodiversity, ecological functions and the provision of ecosystem services while taking into consideration the social aspects that need addressing for sustainable.

Ecological Intensification includes building natural capital, precision agriculture and diversification. Natural capital (the biophysical assets within the natural environment that deliver economic value through ecosystem services) [6] can be conserved and enhanced through a variety of approaches, including organic agriculture, water conservation and conservation agriculture.

Here the authors use citizen science data on bats, birds, and butterflies along urbanization and agricultural intensification gradients in France to show that both environmental change and.

These challenges are further complicated by rapid changes in climate and its additional direct impacts on agriculture, biodiversity and ecological processes.

+ Full description There are many different viewpoints about the best way to deal with the myriad issues associated with land use intensification and this book canvasses a number of these from different parts of the tropical and temperate world.

Contributions of biodiversity to the sustainable intensification of food production: Thematic study for. The State of the World's Biodiversity for Food and Agriculture. ID Dawson*, S Attwood, Sarah E Park, Ramni Jamnadass, W Powell, Terry Sunderland, Roeland Kindt, Stepha McMullin, PN Hoebe, JA Baddeley, Charles Staver, Vincent Vadez, Sammy Carsan, James M Roshetko, Ahmed Amri, Eldad.

Agricultural intensification has caused significant declines in biodiversity, while the profound intensification of European agricultural practices in the past number of decades continues.

This is due to decreasing crop diversity, simplification of cropping methods, the use of fertilizers and pesticides and the homogenization of landscapes, all. A new study compares the effects of expansion vs. intensification of cropland use on global agricultural markets and biodiversity, and finds .The processes of land conversion and agricultural intensification are a significant cause of soil biodiversity loss.

The factors controlling land conversion and agricultural intensification, and hence loss of soil biodiversity, are: population increase, national food insufficiency, internal food production imbalances, progressive urbanization, and a growing shortage of land suitable for.The collapse of biodiversity is – along with climate breakdown – a clear and present danger to our civilisation’s survival.

EU Environmental Governance book. Current and Future Challenges. EU Environmental Governance. Agriculture and biodiversity in Europe. The future of Europe’s farms. With Ariel Brunner, Harriet Bradley.